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ESSENTIAL MYANMAR: 17th SEPT TO 1st OCT 2017

Join us as we explore and photograph perhaps the least discovered country in Southeast Asia.

Immortalised by the likes of Kipling, Masters and Orwell, the mystical land of Myanmar (formerly known as Burma) offers the traveller and photographer a kaleidoscope of colours and culture that will remain with you for a lifetime.

TOUR DATES: 17th Sep to 1st Oct 2017
 
TOUR COST: £3195.00 per person
 
SINGLE SUPPLEMENT: £525
TOUR LEADER: Simon Watkinson
 
INFORMATION ITINERARY BOOK THIS TOUR

 

Until recently closed to western tourism, Myanmar stands as one of the world’s newest destinations. Myanmar is known as the Golden Land not only for its glittering Buddhist monuments and rich cultural heritage, but also for the phenomenal natural beauty found in its forests, rivers, green valleys and coastline. However, it is the inhabitants that give Myanmar its characteristic charm. They have often been described as the most friendly, open-hearted people in the world.

Our itinerary includes Yangon’s Schwedagon Pagoda which dominates the urban skyline, the ancient city of Bagan where thousands of gilded temple spires fill the valley, Inle Lake, where we will photograph local fishermen, bustling local markets and lakeside life seemingly unchanged for centuries. In Mandalay we will photograph monks crossing U Bein bridge, the longest teak bridge in the world.

Each location provides a wide variety of photographic opportunities including early morning hill-tribe markets, street photography, fabulous landscapes, portraits and still life.

Myanmar, is a country of incredible diversity and our journey will be full of  “authentic” travel experiences. We have chosen to run this tour a few weeks before the main tourist season begins, so avoiding the crowds. Temperatures are likely to remain in the high 20’s and even low 30’s°C. We may encounter a few short sharp rain showers which are usually followed by clear weather. This will produce dramatic landscapes, vibrant colours and fewer tourists.